Teacher burnout and participation in professional learning activities: Perspectives from university English language instructors in Turkey

Derya Kulavuz-Onal, Sibel Tatar

Abstract


Over the past decades, teacher burnout has attracted teacher education scholars worldwide as regards to its causes, effects, and amelioration. Although the burnout phenomenon is not new, the research on teacher burnout in Turkey is still relatively recent. Providing a perspective from Turkey, in this study, we investigated burnout and participation in professional learning activities among Turkish EFL (English as a foreign language) instructors at university English preparatory programs, a rarely researched group in this area. Quantitative data were collected from 224 Turkish EFL instructors through a questionnaire consisting three sections, including the Maslach Burnout Inventory for Educators. Our analysis revealed that state university instructors (SUEPPI) and private university instructors (PUEPPI) significantly differ in terms of the levels of sense of personal accomplishment and participation in professional learning activities.  Our findings suggest that, SUEPPI did not feel as accomplished and did not participate in professional learning activities as frequently as PUEPPI, and instructors’ sense of personal accomplishment is positively correlated with their increased participation in professional learning activities.

Keywords


Teacher burnout; professional learning; professional development; teacher education; private university; state university

Full Text:

PDF

References


Baş, T. & Ardıç, K. (2002). A comparison of job satisfaction between public and private university academicians in Turkey. METU Studies in Development, 29, 27−46.

Baysal, A. (1995). Lise ve dengi okul öğretmenlerinde meslekten tükenmişliğe etki eden faktörler [Factors affecting teachers’ professional burnout among high school teachers]. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir, Turkey.

Blase, J. J. (1982). A social-psychological grounded theory of teacher stress and burnout. Educational Administration Quarterly, 184, 93–113.

Bilge, F. (2006). Examining the burnout of academics in relation to job satisfaction and other factors. Social Behavior and Personality: An International Journal, 34, 1151–1160.

Brouwers, A. & Tomic, W. (1999). Teacher burnout, perceived self-efficacy in classroom management, and student disruptive behavior in secondary education. Curriculum and Teaching, 142, 7–26.

Brouwers, A. & Tomic, W. (2000). Disruptive student behavior, perceived self-efficacy and teacher burnout. Retrieved from ERIC database (ED450120).

Brown, C. G. (2012). A systematic review of the relationship between self-efficacy and burnout in

teachers. Educational & Child Psychology, 29 (4), 47–63.

Burke, R. J. & Greenglass, E. R. (1993). Work stress, role conflict, social support, and psychological burnout among teachers. Psychological Reports, 73, 371–380.

Byrne, B. M. (1991). Burnout: Investigating the impact of background variables for elementary, intermediate, secondary, and university educators. Teaching and Teacher Education, 72, 197–209.

Byrne, B. M. (1999). The nomological network of teacher burnout: A literature review and empirically validated model. In R. Vandenberghe, & A. M. Huberman (Eds.) Understanding and preventing teacher burnout: A sourcebook of international research and practice (pp. 15−37). Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Cephe, P. Ş. (2010). A study of the factors leading English teachers to burnout. Hacettepe University Journal of Education, 38, 25−34.

Diaz-Maggioli, G. H. (2003). Options for teacher professional development. English Teaching Forum, 41, 2–13.

Evers, W. J. G., Tomic, W. & Brouwers, A. (2004). Burnout among teachers: Students’ and teachers’ perceptions compared. School Psychology International, 25, 131−148.

Field, A. & Hole, G. (2003). How to design and report experiments. London: SAGE Publications.

Friedman, I. A. (2003). Self-efficacy and burnout in teaching: The importance of interpersonal-relations efficacy. Social Psychology of Education, 6, 191215.

Friedman, I. A. (1999). Turning our schools into a healthier workplace: Bridging between professional self-efficacy and professional demands. In R. Vandenberghe, & A.M. Huberman (Eds.) Understanding and preventing teacher burnout: A sourcebook of international research and practice (pp. 166−175). Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Friedman, I. A. (1991). High- and low-burnout schools: School culture aspects of teacher burnout. Journal of Educational Research, 84, 325333.

Girgin, G. (1995). İlkokul öğretmenlerinde meslekten tükenmişliğin gelişimini etkileyen değişkenlerin analizi ve bir model önerisi: İzmir ili kırsal ve kentsel yöre karşılaştırması [The analysis of the variables affecting teachers’ professional burnout among primary school teachers and a proposal for a model: Comparing the countryside and the city center in İzmir]. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir, Turkey.

Grayson, J. L. & Alvarez, H. K. (2008). School climate factors relating to teacher burnout:

A mediator model. Teaching and Teacher Education, 24, 1349−1363.

Hakanen, J. J., Bakker, A. B. & Schaufeli, W. B. (2006). Burnout and work engagement among teachers. Journal of School Psychology, 43, 495513.

Huberman, M. (1993). Burnout in teaching careers. European Education, 25, 4770.

Huck, S. W. (2004). Reading statistics and research. (4th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson Education Inc.

Johnson, K. E. (2009). Second language teacher education: A sociocultural perspective. New York: Routledge.

Karabıyık, L., Eker, M. & Anbar, A. (2008). Determining the factors that affect burnout among academicians. Ankara University SBF Journal, 63, 91−115.

Kinman, G., Wray, S. & Strange, C. (2011). Emotional labour, burnout and job satisfaction in

UK teachers: the role of workplace social support. Educational Psychology, 31, 843−856.

Kwakman, K. (2003). Factors affecting teachers’ participation in professional learning activities. Teaching and Teacher Education, 19, 149−170.

Lackritz, R. J. (2004). Exploring burnout among university faculty: Incidence, performance and demographic issues. Teaching and Teacher Education, 20, 713−729.

Leiter, M. P. (1993). Burnout as a developmental process: Consideration of models. In W. B. Schaufeli, C. Maslach & T. Marek (Eds.), Professional burnout: Recent developments in theory and research (pp. 237−250). Washington, DC: Taylor and Francis.

Leithwood, K. A., Menzies, T., Jantzi, D. & Leithwood, J. (1999). Teacher burnout: A critical challenge of restructuring schools. In R. Vandenberghe, & A. M. Huberman (Eds.), Understanding and preventing teacher burnout: A sourcebook of international research and practice (pp. 85−114). Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Lopez, J. M. O., Santiago, M. J., Godas, A., Castro, C., Villardefrancos, E. & Ponte, D. (2008). An integrative approach to burnout in secondary school teachers: Examining the role of student disruptive behavior and disciplinary issues. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 8, 259−270.

Manguson, S., Norem, K. & Wilcoxon, S. A. (2002). Counseling leaders' strategies for stimulating professional development and avoiding burnout. TCA Journal, 30, 17−25.

Maslach, C. & Jackson, S. E. (1981). The measurement of experienced burnout. Journal of Occupational Behavior, 22, 99−114.

Maslach, C. & Leiter, M. (1999). Teacher burnout: A research agenda. In R. Vandenberghe, & A. M. Huberman (Eds.), Understanding and preventing teacher burnout: A sourcebook of international research and practice (pp. 295−303). Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Maslach, C. & Schaufeli, W. B. (1993). Historical and conceptual development of burnout. In W.B. Schaufeli, C. Maslach & T. Marek (Eds.), Professional burnout: Recent developments in theory and research (pp. 2−16). Washington, DC: Taylor and Francis.

Maslach, C., Jackson, S. E. & Leiter, M. P. (1996). Maslach burnout inventory manual. (3rd ed.). Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.

Mazur, P.J. & Lynch, M. D. (1989). Differential impact of administrative, organizational, and personality factors on teacher burnout. Teaching and Teacher Education, 5, 337−353.

Mede, E. (2009). An analysis of relations among personal variables, perceived self-efficacy, and social support on burnout among Turkish EFL teachers. Inonu University Journal of the Faculty of Education, 10(2), 39-52.

Meirink, A. J., Meijer, P. C., Verloop, N. & Bergen, T. C. M. (2009). How do teachers learn in the workplace? An examination of teacher learning activities. European Journal of Teacher Education, 32, 209−224.

Miller, L. (1999). Reframing teacher burnout in the context of school reform and teacher development in the United States. In R. Vandenberghe & A. M. Huberman (Eds.) Understanding and preventing teacher burnout: A sourcebook of international research and practice (pp. 139−156). Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Navarro, M. L. A., Mas, M. B. & Jimenez, A. M. L. (2010). Working conditions, burnout and stress symptoms in university professors: Validating a structural model of the mediating effect of perceived personal competence. The Spanish Journal of Psychology, 13, 284−296.

Otero-Lopez, J. M., Marino, M. J. S. & Bolano, C. C. (2008). An integrating approach to the study of burnout in university professors. Psicothema, 20, 766−772.

Ozer, N. & Beycioglu, K. (2010). The relationship between teacher professional development and burnout. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 2(2), 4928−4932.

Pietarinen, J., Pyhältö, K., Soini, T., & Salmela-Aro, K. (2013). Reducing teacher burnout: A socio-contextual approach. Teaching and Teacher Education, 35, 62−72.

Rey, L., Extremera, N. & Pena, M. (2012). Burnout and work engagement in teachers: Are sex and level taught important? Ansiedad y Estrés, 18(2-3), 119−129.

Richards, J. C. & Farrell T. S. C. (2005). Professional development for language teachers: Strategies for teacher learning. Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Sleegers, P. (1999). Professional identity, school reform, and burnout: Some reflections on teacher burnout. In R. Vandenberghe & A. M. Huberman (Eds.) Understanding and preventing teacher burnout: A sourcebook of international research and practice (pp. 227−255). Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Shanafelt, T. D., West, C. P., Sloan, A. J., Novotny, P. J., Poland, G. A., Menaker, R., Rummans, T. A. & Dyrbye, L. N. Career fit and burnout among academic faculty (2009). Arch Intern Med, 169, 990−995.

Schaufeli, W. B. & Salanova, M. (2007). Efficacy or inefficacy, that's the question: burnout and work engagement, and their relationships with efficacy beliefs. Anxiety, Stress, & Coping. An International Journal, 20, 177−196.

Skaalvik, E. M. & Skaalvik, S. (2009). Does school context matter? Relations with teacher burnout and job satisfaction. Teaching and Teacher Education, 25, 518−524.

Skaalvik, E. M. & Skaalvik, S. (2010). Teacher self-efficacy and teacher burnout: A study of relations. Teaching and Teacher Education, 26, 1059−1069.

Skaalvik, E. M. & Skaalvik, S. (2014). Teacher self-efficacy and perceived autonomy:

Relations with teacher engagement, job satisfaction, and emotional exhaustion.

Psychological Reports: Employment Psychology & Marketing, 114(1), 68−77.

Toker, B. (2011). Burnout among university academicians: An empirical study on the universities of

Turkey. Dogus University Journal, 12(1), 114−127.

Watts, J., & Robertson, N. (2011). Burnout in university teaching staff: A systematic literature

review. Educational Research, 53(1), 33−50.


Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.


Journal of Language and Linguistic Studies
ISSN 1305-578X (Online)
Copyright © Journal of Language and Linguistic Studies